What Do You Know about Propaganda?

campingdc2

Image from my library – camping in a wilderness area with friends

Lesson One

We will begin with a few simple facts hidden from you by our governments. You are currently being misled into a  campaign of hate by the media meant to derail honest discussions. The western media in particular have side-tracked important issues concerning our future.

Let’s get into lesson one about Propaganda

How many vehicles do you own? How many kilometers do you drive per year and what is the cost of your fuel consumption?

Developers are building what I call mini-castles as a family home. Do you need 7 bedrooms and 6 bathrooms? You might find room to plant a flower beside the 2 or 3 car garage.

The best calculator I was able to find is from The National Geographic website. It gives you a glance at your foot print on our planet.

Give it a try since it is one of the few things really free on the Internet. Everything else is cluttered with ways to save money by spending it called advertising.

This ends lesson one on how propaganda is used every day.

Our Economic System is Designed to Fail – Ron Paul

The current economic system is designed to fail, but so was socialism. That’s according to former GOP Congressman Ron Paul, who told RT’s Boom Bust show that we need to go toward a system of property ownership, voluntary contracts and individual liberty, while getting rid of central banks.

RT: Do you think this poll is just politics, or do you agree that there is something wrong with the US economic system as it operates today?

Ron Paul: I think the problem is all in semantics. When they say they oppose today’s capitalism, I oppose today’s so-called capitalism. I don’t even like the world “capitalism,” I like “free markets.” But if you say “free markets” and “capitalism” together, we don’t have that. We have interventionism. We have a planned economy, we have a welfare state, we have inflationism, we have central economic planning  by a central bank, we have a belief in deficit financing. It is so far removed from free-market capitalism that it’s foolish for people to label it free market and capitalize on this and say: “We know it’s so bad. What we need is socialism.” That is a problem.

That is a problem in definitions and understanding of what kind of policies we have. I am a champion of free markets, but not of the current system that we have today. I am highly critical of it, because it is designed to fail. It is designed to reward the rich; it is designed inevitably to destroy the middle class, and also to finance some of the worst things in government: all the deficits with the welfare state and for the warfare state. So yes, it’s failing. People should reject what we have, but they shouldn’t reject liberty and freedom and sound economic policies, because that is not the problem. The problem is we don’t have enough free markets.

RT: In the same poll it is said that Senator Bernie Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, has been the most popular candidate for America’s 18-29 year olds. Despite the fact that he is now losing steam, as we’ve seen on the campaign trail, what does it really say to you about what’s driving this voting pattern?

RP: He’s tapped into something, something that I’ve talked about for years and tapped into when I was a candidate. And that is to describe the frustrations, the evil, and the nonsense of what we have. The problem with Bernie and myself is that he sees it quite differently. He thinks that it’s too much freedom and too much capitalism. And I see it as too much government; it’s too much of interventionist planned economy, which leans itself to fascism. But the young people might not understand the economics and what free markets are really all about, and they don’t understand central banking. And Bernie doesn’t understand that we have to get rid of central planning – from the Central Bank – if we want to help these people.

The current economic system is designed to fail, but so was socialism. What we need to go toward is property ownership, voluntary contracts and individual liberty in getting rid of the central bank.

But yes, I am not a bit surprised – it is a good sign that they are upset and they ought to be. What I have in mind is to show them the difference between what we have and what we should have. And believe me, it is not going toward this ancient tradition of government and socialism. That is what the 20th century was all about, whether it was a fascist system in Germany, or the Soviet system of communism – this all has been a failure. Then you might talk about a real alternative. The young people have a justification; they are justified in detesting what we have, because it has served the rich and has really hurt the poor and the middle class.

Read More Source: ‘Our economic system is designed to fail’ – Ron Paul — RT Op-Edge

 Climate Solutions – World Urban Farms

A dis-used office in The Hague has been revamped as a sprawling rooftop greenhouse, with a fish farm operating on the floor below. Are we entering a new age of urban agriculture?

Mark Durno, the 31-year-old Scot in charge of the operation, believes commercial urban farms serve a need: people want high-quality food from a transparent, local source. “In the next five or even 15 years, this will be a niche of the niche,” admits Durno. “But it links into the circular economy: we have empty rooftops and empty industrial buildings. In The Hague, 15% of buildings are empty. Let’s fill them with produce.”

Modern technology has helped make urban farming a viable prospect. At UrbanFarmers, the shimmery tilapia swim in 28 tanks. Baby fish, farmed in nearby Eindhoven, come in on one side, fed by an automated system; across the room are tanks for the bigger fish.

In another vat of water, bacteria convert waste ammonia from fish excrement into nitrates to fertilize the plants on the roof above. Meanwhile, the plants – which are grown without soil – purify the fish water. This closed system, known as aquaponics, has been used for centuries.

“With industrialization, that connection between agriculture and the city was taken away,” says Jan Willem van der Schans, a researcher in urban food systems at the Landbouw Economisch Instituut (LEI). (link goes to English version)

“Food can be grown anywhere and sent anywhere else. UrbanFarmers is an example of cities reconnecting with food. Consumers feel alienated from global food chains, want food from a transparent source, and they see that quality can be better if it grows close to home.”

Van der Schans wonders, however, if urban farms can find commercial success. “UrbanFarmers has to come up with products that you can’t buy in supermarkets, something special that has a higher nutritional value, otherwise I think they will have a hard time,” he says. “They really have to pick those vegetables that have a special quality if you harvest them immediately, like soft tomatoes like coeur de boeuf that should fall apart if you carry them 10 meters (approx 30′).”

In New York, the growers on the rooftops came up with many varieties of clean food. The number of food-producing farms and gardens in New York City has grown from approximately 700 to 900 over the last two years.

Read: Greenhouse in the sky: inside Europe’s biggest urban farm | Cities | The Guardian

Read: New York City Five Borough Urban Farm Agriculture Development. Website has photos, videos, graphs and numerous other ongoing urban projects.

“Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising which tempt you to believe your critics are right. To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires courage.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

A Stock-Market Crash of 50%+ Would Not Be a Surprise

After long eras of over-valuation, like the period we have been in since the late 1990s (with the notable exceptions of the lows after the 2000 and 2007 crashes), stocks have also often transitioned.

Why isn’t anyone talking about those facts?

Three reasons:

  • First, as mentioned, no one in the financial community likes to hear bad news or to be the bearer of bad news when it comes to stock prices. It’s bad for business.
  • Second, valuation is nearly useless as a market-timing indicator.
  • Third, yes, there is a (probably small) chance that it’s “different this time,” and all the historically predictive valuation measures are out-dated and no longer predictive.

The third reason is the one that everyone who is bullish about stocks these days is implicitly or explicitly relying on: “It’s different this time.”

Just so you know, every time there is a long bull market like the one we’ve had, people come up with lots of reasons to explain why it’s different this time.  (And understandably so! Everyone wants the bull market to continue, and no one wants to miss further gains.) They did that in the late 1920s. They did that in the late 1990s. They did that in 2007. Usually, however, it isn’t different this time, and normality reasserts itself with a vengeance.

Rest of the story at A Stock-Market Crash of 50%+ Would Not Be a Surprise — Or The Worst-Case Scenario | David Stockman’s Contra Corner

Class Warfare, American Style–Part II–Privatize, Deregulate, Outsource & Offshore

Here is an excellent article for Canadians to read. It applies in many ways to our slow economic growth and the loss of independent business start ups. Canada has far too little oversight on industries that strip mine forests, pollute rivers and lakes including the mining industries. A nuclear waste dump 1 mile from the Great Lakes is pure insanity.

Rcooley123's Blog

Privatizing, deregulating, outsourcing and offshoring of various functions have become major goals for conservative forces in America. They all serve to concentrate wealth and power in the hands of a small percentage of the populace at the expense of the rest while claiming to increase efficiency, lower costs and grow the economy. They all neglect the purposes for which the activities were made public or regulated to begin with. They cost real people good paying jobs, endangering the health and wellbeing of themselves and their families. Inequality in income and wealth is increasing as a result, along with a real drop in the opportunity for advancement by the vast majority of people in our society.

One area where privatization has seen a push in recent years is public education reform. Prisons have been another target for corporate takeover of government functions. Both provide major public services affecting society as a…

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