Being Thankful in Canada

We can be thankful for the elected Parliamentary style government in the nation’s capital Ottawa. A parliamentary style government is the most common one used world wide.

Thankfully we do not have to put up with a circus even close to what is happening in the United States. (please bring back your Constitution and get rid of the Patriot Act)

Our Prime Minister is hand picked by fulling paid up members from a Party. Whichever party wins a majority the leader becomes the Prime Minister. The flaw in the system is having a government in office with less than 40% of the votes. We could rectify it by allowing proportional representation although I am doubtful it will happen. Canada also has a few elected members of Parliament who remain Independent. Most of it comprises of Liberals, New Democrats, Conservatives, Green Party and Bloc Québécois.

I see the unelected Senate in Canada as a deporable group of political party appointees having one thing in common. They paid into a political party and are handed a highly paid position with an elaborate pension. Many need to be flown into the country from their homes in Bermuda, or elsewhere, simply to cast a vote in the Senate.

India is a shining example of a nation who ridded itself of a Senate along with connections to the monarchy. (The United States did a beautiful job of sending the monarchy for a long walk off a short cliff). Every member of the two Houses in India are elected as it should be in any country calling itself democratic.

Canada’s government for reasons unknown to Canadians, continues to give its loyalty and Oath of Allegiance, to the Queen of England. Any person working for the Federal and Provincial governments must give thier oath to the same foreigner. Elected Provincial governments  must also bow to monarchy when they give their Oath of Allegiance. The evidence is on Canadian currency and behind the judge in a court of law.

We hear the politicians talk about transperancy and openness  every time they are front of a camera. In the truest sense of the word transperancy Canadians would know exactly what the government is doing. It would also mean the various governments would let the people know where every dollar is being spent. Cities would no longer spend federal and provincial funds on projects meant to satisfy their egos. Any association or company recieving funds from the Federal and Provincial governments would be accountable.

What’s the point of saying you are accountable when clear cut accounting is not available for Canadians to see? It’s all too easy for politicians to hide behind the Oath given to the Queen of England.

Scattered geniously into the mix is a myriad of appointees, paid up political hacks, sitting on 1000s of committees.

When Canada elects a true reformer the task will be to eliminate the governor general, lieutenant governors, senate and bring the Oath of Alligence up to date.

New Oath of Allegiance

I, do swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Canada, the Constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

For those who break and/or breech the Charter daily feel free to leave Canada permanently.

Dennis Cambly

Next article is based on his photo.

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Proportional Representation Leads to More Diverse, Cooperative Politics

Response to Bill Tieleman and other Electoral Reform naysayers

Canadian society is incredibly diverse. However, we currently use an antiquated electoral system that was designed in the 13th century for a country that had only two political parties. As such, Canada’s House of Commons is overwhelmingly dominated by a small number of political parties – usually just two. This lack of variety fails to represent the multitude of voices and opinions in Canadian society.

Tieleman slights the federal Green party, whose seat count remains low due to the current voting system. Does Tieleman think that smaller parties such as the Greens shouldn’t have a voice in our parliament? I can’t help but think of 1990s provincial politics, when the leader of the BC NDP, the party Tieleman once served as an advisor to, labeled environmentalists as the enemies of B.C. Or again in the 2000s when the BC NDP opposed the province’s incredibly progressive carbon tax.

Having a party like the Greens, even if just on the periphery, has ensured that the more regressive policies of the BC NDP have been challenged. The party had to adapt to such criticism, and become a more progressive political party for it. Sometimes even opposition parties need to be opposed.

Tieleman wants us to believe a greater diversity of voices will mean racism and intolerance in Canada’s parliament.

New Zealand, a country that uses proportional representation, shows that exactly the opposite can happen: Indigenous people have a louder voice in parliament, which encourages tolerance, cooperation and respect. The Māori party regularly wins seats (even outside of the seven electorates set aside for Māori candidates) and is part of New Zealand’s current coalition government. Of the eight political parties that contested New Zealand’s 2014 election, three of them had leaders of Māori heritage.

Coalition and minority governments can be extremely productive. Lester Pearson’s minority Liberal government was one of the most fruitful governments that Canada has ever had. Pushed to cooperate with the NDP, we saw the creation of public healthcare, Canada Pension Plan, Student Loans, a Canadian Flag, the 40-hour work week, two weeks of vacation time and a new minimum wage. So when detractors of proportional representation warn of parliamentary gridlock, be skeptical. The exact opposite can happen when parties work together.

When was the last time that a federal Canadian political party with seats had a non-Caucasian leader? Certainly not during my lifetime, if ever.

Read the entire Article: Proportional Representation Leads to More Diverse, Cooperative Politics | The Tyee